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Cold Pneumonia Bronchitis - What's Good for Bronchitis?
Bronchitis pain ide pulmonary disease caused by the onset of inflammation in the bronchial tubes, which are the air passages into the lungs. In bronchitis these air passages become inflamed and swollen, a thick mucus is generally produced, and is often accompanied by a wheezing cough. Symptoms may also include a difficulty in breathing, the need to constantly cough out mucus, and a mild to moderate fever. There are two forms of bronchitis, acute and chronic, which are somewhat similar and with similar causes, but run their course in different ways.

Acute bronchitis is characterized by a slight fever that may last for a few days to weeks, and is often accompanied by a cough that may persist for several weeks. Acute bronchitis often occurs after a cold or the flu, as the result of bacterial infection, or from constant irritation of the bronchi by polluted air or chemical fumes in the environment. It may initially affect your nose, sinuses, and throat and then spread to the lungs. For acute bronchitis, symptoms usually resolve within 7 to 10 days, however, a dry, hacking cough can linger for several weeks. Accept the way things are in life. Only then will you be able to accept these points on Acute Bronchitis Symptoms. Acute Bronchitis Symptoms can be considered to be part and parcel of life.

To aid the body in healing, get plenty of rest, good nutrition, and drink at least 8-12 cups of water daily. Using a humidifier may also be helpful. Avoid exposure to tobacco smoke and other air pollutants. Limit consumption of milk, sugar, and white flour. Some vitamins and herbs are considered helpful in treating, or preventing, acute bronchitis. Herbs, and other healing foods, which may be beneficial include: angelica, anise, caraway, cayenne, chickweed, cinnamon, clove, cumin, elecampane, eucalyptus, garlic, ginger, horehound, licorice root, lovage, marjoram, mullein, mugwort, onion, oregano, pineapple, primrose, rosemary, saffron, sage, savory, slippery elm, spicy foods, stinging nettle, and thyme. Supplements which may be helpful include: beta-carotene, B complex, C, calcium & magnesium, E, and zinc. Ignorance is bliss they say. However, do you find this practical when you read so much about Acute Bronchitis Symptoms?
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The Chance for Recovery is Poor for People With Advanced Chronic Bronchitis
Early recognition and treatment, however, can significantly improve the opportunity for a good outcome. Chronic bronchitis also makes you susceptible to recurrent respiratory infections. Call your doctor if you suffer any of these symptoms: coughing up blood; shortness of breath or chest pain; a high fever or shaking chills; a low-grade fever that lasts for three or more days; thick, greenish mucus; or a frequently recurring cough. Keep your mind open to anything when reading about Bronchitis Herbs. Opinions may differ, but it is the base of Bronchitis Herbs that is important.

Chronic bronchitis, also known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD, may include fever, nasal congestion, and a hacking cough that can linger for months at a time. As the condition gets worse, the affected person becomes increasingly short of breath, has difficulty with physical exertion, and may require supplemental oxygen. Chemical and biological irritation is believed to be the primary cause of chronic bronchitis, with exposure to cigarette smoke being the main cause. The severity of the disease is often determined by the extent and duration of exposure to tobacco smoke. Make the best use of life by learning and reading as much as possible. read about things unknown, and more about things known, like about Lungs Bronchitis.

Disclaimer: This article is for entertainment purposes only, and is not intended for use as diagnosis or treatment of a health problem or as a substitute for consulting a licensed medical professional.

The fluoroquinolones are a relatively new group of antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones were first introduced in 1986, but they are really modified quinolones, a class of antibiotics, whose accidental discovery occurred in the early 1960.

The fluoroquinolones are a family of synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with bactericidal activity. The parent of the group is nalidixic acid, discovered in 1962 by Lescher and colleagues. The first fluoroquinolones were widely used because they were the only orally administered agents available for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-negative organisms, including Pseudomonas species.

Urinary tract infections (norfloxacin, lomefloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Lower respiratory tract infections (lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Skin and skin-structure infections (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Urethral and cervical gonococcal infections (norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Prostatitis (norfloxacin, ofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Acute sinusitis (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin (Avelox), trovafloxacin) Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Community-acquired pneumonia (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Having a penchant for Bronchitis led us to write all that there has been written on Bronchitis here. Hope you too develop a penchant for Bronchitis! :o.

Because of concern about hepatotoxicity, trovafloxacin therapy should be reserved for life- or limb-threatening infections requiring inpatient treatment (hospital or long-term care facility), and the drug should be taken for no longer than 14 days. There has been an uncalculatable amount of information added in this composition on Chronic Bronchitis. Don't try counting it!

Second-generation agents include ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin is the most potent fluoroquinolone against P. aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin are the most widely used second-generation quinolones because of their availability in oral and intravenous formulations and their broad set of FDA-labeled indications.

All of the fluoroquinolones are effective in treating urinary tract infections caused by susceptible organisms. They are the first-line treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis in patients who cannot tolerate sulfonamides or TMP, who live in geographic areas with known resistance > 10% to 20% to TMP-SMX, or who have risk factors for such resistance. We would like you to leisurely go through this article on Bronchitis to get the real impact of the article. Bronchitis is a topic that has to be read clearly to be understood.

Conditions Treated With Fluoroquinolones: Indications and Uses
The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections. The serum elimination half-life of the fluoroquinolones range from 3 -20 hours, allowing for once or twice daily dosing. Don't be surprised if you find anything unusual here about Bronchitis. There has been some interesting and unusual things here worth reading.

Fluoroquinolones Advantages:
Ease of administration Daily or twice daily dosing Excellent oral absorption Excellent tissue penetration Prolonged half-lives Significant entry into phagocytic cells Efficacy Overall safety There is a lot of jargon connected with Chronic Bronchitis. However, we have eliminated the difficult ones, and only used the ones understood by everyone.

First Generation
The first-generation agents include cinoxacin and nalidixic acid, which are the oldest and least often used quinolones. These drugs had poor systemic distribution and limited activity and were used primarily for gram-negative urinary tract infections. Cinoxacin and nalidixic acid require more frequent dosing than the newer quinolones, and they are more susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance.

Quote:Because of their expanded antimicrobial spectrum, third-generation fluoroquinolones are useful in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute sinusitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, which are their primary FDA-labeled indications. The third-generation fluoroquinolones include levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin. Sometimes, what we hear about Bronchitis can prove to be rather hilarious and illogical. This is why we have introduced this side of Bronchitis to you. Big Grin.
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